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Blog Category: Data Centers

Posted by: on December 12, 2013

I was recently invited to speak at several events on the Arabian Peninsula. Obtaining visas and vaccination documents in preparation for the almost three-week, five-city tour was quite a challenge—as was airport security once I arrived. Apparently, no one liked the idea of the electronics and wires of Belden’s demonstration kit traveling in the airliner cargo hold…

While much of my adventure could be better summed up in a travel warning blog, I did have the opportunity to visit with colleagues, customers and partners to glean plenty of feedback on the data center trends of the region. In doing so, I realized that the portion of my presentation focusing on energy savings wasn’t exactly of great concern in the region—in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, gasoline is just 45 cents a gallon.

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Tags: Data Center

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Blog Category: Data Centers

Posted by: Paul Kish on December 05, 2013

While not officially considered “over the hill,” Ethernet recently celebrated its big “4-0.” Since its birth in 1973 and the publication of the 10BASE-T Ethernet standard in 1990, a lot has changed. Every five to seven years, Ethernet has grown up by a factor of 10—in speed that is.

Just take a look at twisted-pair cabling alone. We went from 10BASE-T with a data rate of 10 Mb/s over category 3 cabling in 1990, to 100BASE-TX at 100 Mb/s over category 5 in 1995, to 1000BASE-T at 1 Gb/s over category 5e or higher in 1999, to 10GBASE-T at 10 Gb/s over category 6A in 2006. And now we’re less than two years away from 40GBASE-T at 40 Gb/s over future category 8 cabling. Fiber is another story—moving from 1 Gb/s over multimode and singlemode fiber in 1998 to 10 Gb/s in 2003 to 100 Gb/s in 2010. That’s speed increased by a factor of 100 in just 12 years!

I am honored to have taken part in the development of higher performing cabling to support the different generations of Ethernet standards with some vital principles staying the same.

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Tags: Ethernet

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Blog Category: Data Centers

Posted by: on November 28, 2013

While many of you are probably thankful that grandma isn't baking the turkey in your data center cold aisle, and dad isn't recording the football game on your company's surveillance DVR, we wanted to take a minute to let all of our Belden data center blog fans know just how thankful we are that you continue to read and comment on our blog every week.

We are committed to providing you with useful, thought-provoking information on the latest and greatest data center technologies, standards and trends—not to mention solutions to the many problems that our data center customers face on a daily basis. We're thankful for this opportunity. Please check out the data center blog archive for topics you might have missed, or to revisit one you would enjoy reading again. Happy Thanksgiving to our U.S. readers, and many thanks to all of our readers and customers around the world for your ongoing support. We'll be back next week.

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Blog Category: Data Centers

Posted by: on November 21, 2013

As a follow up to my last blog regarding whether or not to include patch cords when testing a fiber channel, another question that has long plagued fiber testing is whether to use the 1-, 2- or 3-jumper reference method.

As shown in the graphic, what is being measured in a fiber channel varies greatly depending on the reference method selected. So it’s a good idea to understand why the 1-jumper method is preferred and what the difference is between the three methods.

1 Jumper


The 1-jumper reference method recommended by both TIA and IEC standards assesses the condition of the channel end faces against a very high quality multimode connector from the test reference jumper (i.e., 0.1dB per mated pair), and it includes the loss of the connections at both ends of the channel. Because much of the loss is a result of those connections, the 1-jumper reference method provides the highest accuracy.

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Tags: Fiber Testing

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Blog Category: Data Centers

Posted by: on November 18, 2013

With data centers needing to support increased bandwidth demands, being faced with growing energy costs and with the movement toward virtualization and cloud, it's more apparent than ever that the data center of tomorrow will be vastly different than the data center of today.

Belden offers up a panel of data center experts to address questions you have relating to data center standards, configuration and topology options, migration strategies, efficiencies, and more. Line up your questions now!

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Blog Category: Data Centers

Posted by: on November 14, 2013

Discussions surrounding whether or not to test a fiber channel with the patch cords have been unclear. The answer to this long-standing question is “it depends.” Let’s take a closer a look.

First Check the Spec

In reality, the main deciding factor for whether to test the channel with the patch cords included or to just test the permanent link depends on the specification provided by the end user or their consultant. If the spec calls for it, you need to include them. It’s that simple.

Then Consider the Facts

If after checking the spec the question still remains as to whether or not patch cords should be included in channel testing, consider the fact that patch cords are factory terminated and offer a lower risk of defect and errors. Installation of the permanent link typically has much more impact on the performance and insertion loss of the channel.

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Tags: Data Center, Fiber Testing

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Blog Category: Data Centers

Posted by: on November 07, 2013

Is Your Copper Pre-Term Up to Par? Posted by: Michael Salvador, on November 7, 2013 With many of today’s data centers now consisting of flattened architectures that deploy end of row (EoR) and middle of row (MoR) designs where 10GBASE-T access switches connect to servers within the row, horizontal cabling lengths have become shorter than ever.

The channel length between an access switch and a server in a neighboring cabinet can be as short as three meters for a two-connector channel. Since it is actually more difficult to meet category 6A performance parameters for 10GBASE-T over a shorter distance, it’s important to make sure that your cabling solutions are up to par. If not, you might find yourself having to deal with excess cabling slack and potential airflow concerns.

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Tags: Data Center, Pre-Terminated Cabling

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Blog Category: Data Centers

Posted by: on October 31, 2013

While 3-phase power allows utilities to deliver more power over smaller, less expensive wires, there are more compelling reasons for using three-phase in the data center—specifically 3-phase Wye.
Why 3-Phase?

To understand electric power in the data center, you need to first understand single- and 3-phase power distribution. Most homes are wired with single-phase that uses one ac voltage delivered over two hot wires and one neutral wire. The voltage across the two hot wires measures 240VAC (for your oven or dryer) and across any hot to neutral measures 120VAC (for everything else).

Most commercial businesses are wired with 3-phase that consists of three ac voltages separated from each other by 120 electrical degrees, or by a third of a cycle. These systems deliver power over three hot wires where the voltage across any two hot wires measures 208VAC.

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